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Article
May 1935

TRACHEOBRONCHIAL ASPIRATION OF BUCCOPHARYNGEAL SECRETION DURING ETHER ANESTHESIA: IMMEDIATE POSTOPERATIVE BRONCHOSCOPIC STUDY OF TWENTY-ONE PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Department of Otolaryngology, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(5):561-573. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020575007
Abstract

Postoperative pulmonary complications, especially of the suppurative type, have been suspected of being induced by one or the other of two principal mechanisms, aspiration into the lower respiratory passages and vascular embolism. Many excellent studies have been made in an effort to substantiate or disprove one or the other of these modes of pathogenesis. One line of investigation has concerned itself with the demonstration of two types of aspiration and their sequelae—(1) aspiration of secretions from the mouth, nose or pharynx or from all of them in anesthetized animals and in patients following operations on or adjoining the pharynx or on parts draining into the pharynx and (2) aspiration or insufflation of infective material in animals. The other line of investigation has concerned itself with the localization and sequelae of various septic emboli introduced into the venous circulation. Some of the principal proponents of the circulatory

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