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Article
June 1935

NASAL AND BRONCHIAL ALLERGY IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(6):653-662. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020668003
Abstract

The frequency of nasal and bronchial allergy in childhood needs constant emphasis in the minds of all physicians. Pediatricians have long realized this fact since the epochal work of O. M. Schloss,1 who was the first to demonstrate the clinical value of the skin reaction, and whose other contributions on allergy in childhood up to 1920 laid the basis of much of the present knowledge of this subject.

Of general interest is the realization that the statistics on the frequency of allergy in the general population must be changed. Thus, my analysis carried out on two thousand students at the University of California showed a personal history of allergy in 33 per cent and a family history of allergy in 35 per cent. When Vaughan2 included migraine, gastrointestinal allergy and food idiosyncrasies with urticaria, eczema, hay fever and asthma, he found evidence of personal allergy in

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