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Article
June 1935

VALUE OF THE REFLEX CONTRACTION OF THE MUSCLES OF THE MIDDLE EAR AS AN INDICATOR OF HEARING

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, the University of Chicago. Work done in part under a grant from the Douglas Smith Foundation.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(6):663-676. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020678004
Abstract

Investigations on the physiology of the ear have always been limited by the lack of a method of determining the function of hearing in the animal. Most of the classic research on the organ of hearing has been carried out heretofore by means of clinical observations and histopathologic examinations (for example, Bezold's investigations on otosclerosis).

A reliable method of estimating the function of hearing not only is a necessity from the standpoint of experimentation on animals but also would be of definite value if it could be adapted to clinical use and so obviate the necessity of depending on the statements of the patient as to hearing function. It is, therefore, understandable that several attempts have been made to use reflexes as an indicator of hearing. Cemach,1 who studied them intensively named several motor responses which in his opinion are certain indicators of cochlear function. According to Cemach

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