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Article
June 1935

SURGICAL APPROACHES TO DEEP SUPPURATION IN THE NECK AND POSTERIOR MEDIASTINUM

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(6):707-716. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020722009
Abstract

In his classic treatise entitled "Topographical Anatomy," published in 1887, Tillaux stated that the cervical fascia is an exceedingly variable structure and that this variability explains a certain confusion or difference in the descriptions of various authors. It was Tillaux's chief endeavor to present a description of the cervical fasciae which would harmonize with the recognized pathologic conditions of the neck. About forty years later Tandler,1 after mentioning the complicated arrangement and interrelations of the various structures of the neck, pointed out that this very complexity led to the most divergent descriptions and interpretations by various anatomists.

The cervical fascia is usually described as consisting of three layers —a superficial or investing, a middle or visceral and a deep or prevertebral layer. The first or outer layer completely surrounds the neck and is attached to the skull and mandible above and to the clavicles and sternum below.

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