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Article
September 1935

SUBCUTANEOUS EMPHYSEMA FOLLOWING TONSILLECTOMY: Report of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;22(3):331-333. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640030345009
Abstract

Subcutaneous emphysema following tonsillectomy is not uncommon, though relatively few reports of its occurrence have appeared in the literature. It is not a serious complication but is apt to be disconcerting to the surgeon, and its prevention should be possible in most instances. For this reason the following two cases which occurred in my experience may be of enough interest to record.

REPORT OF CASES

CASE 1.—J. K., a stockily built man of German extraction, aged 65, was referred to me because of a chronic degenerative macular change in the retina of obscure origin. The patient had been under the care of a physician for five years for the relief of primary anemia. For the past four years he had eaten ½ pound (226.88 Gm.) of raw liver every day, which apparently had controlled the primary anemia. The results of examination were essentially negative except for the laboratory findings, which

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