[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1936

CHICAGO LARYNGOLOGICAL AND OTOLOGICAL SOCIETYRegular Monthly Meeting, Nov. 4, 1935

Arch Otolaryngol. 1936;23(2):257-264. doi:10.1001/archotol.1936.00640040264009

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

HEREDOFAMILIAL TELANGIECTASIS OR THE RENDU-OSLER-WEBER DISEASE. DR. SAMUEL J. PEARLMAN.

Hereditary telangiectasis is an unhereditary condition in which the terminal vessels, i. e., the capillaries and venules, become dilated. Recurring, intermittent hemorrhage from the affected vessels often occurs. This defect is transmitted by both sexes and affects both male and female offspring. Familial epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, gastro-intestinal bleeding and uterine bleeding are often different forms of the Rendu-Osler-Weber disease. The telangiectases may occur anywhere in the skin or mucous membranes.

The diagnosis is made on the history of repeated hemorrhages, the hereditary background and the telangiectatic areas. The blood picture is normal except for secondary anemia due to the recurring hemorrhages. Rarely the spleen is enlarged.

A physician, aged 61, entered Cook County Hospital on Sept. 12, 1935, complaining of recurrent epistaxis from which he had suffered over a period of fifty-five years. He stated

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×