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Article
May 1936

DEVELOPMENT OF THE OTIC CAPSULE: III. FETAL AND INFANTILE CHANGES IN THE FISSULAR REGION AND THEIR PROBABLE RELATIONSHIP TO THE FORMATION OF OTOSCLEROTIC FOCI

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.
From the Department of Anatomy, the University of Wisconsin.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1936;23(5):509-525. doi:10.1001/archotol.1936.00640040519001
Abstract

The fissula ante fenestram, a channel of connective tissue extending from the vestibule at its junction with the scala vestibuli through the otic capsule in front of the oval window to the middle ear, is a constant structure in the human ear. It was first referred to by Huschke1 in 1844, by Hyrtl2 in 1845 and by Siebenmann3 in 1890. The early literature on this structure was summarized by me4 in 1930 and need not be cited here. Since 1930 the fissula has been studied more extensively. In 1933 I5 described its development from the earliest embryologic appearance to full term. Anson and Wilson6 in 1933 described the fissula in an adult human ear, and Anson and Martin7 in 1935 and Wilson8 in 1935 discussed its form, contents, variations and deformations in early life. Considerable variations in the size and shape of

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