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Article
July 1936

LABYRINTHITIS SECONDARY TO MENINGOCOCCIC MENINGITIS: A CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Otologic Service and the laboratories of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1936;24(1):19-28. doi:10.1001/archotol.1936.00640050026003
Abstract

Deafness is, unfortunately, not an uncommon sequel of meningococcic meningitis. The deafness is usually bilateral and often complete. Not infrequently it is due to labyrinthitis secondary to an extension of infection from the meninges. The exact channel through which the infection is transmitted to the labyrinth cannot always be determined, nor is the pathologic picture in the early stages of the resultant labyrinthitis definitely known. It is assumed that this extension usually takes place either along preexisting routes, such as the nerve tunnels within the internal auditory meatus and the aquaeductus cochleae, or by way of the blood stream.

This report is based on a study of serial sections of temporal bones which showed evidences of early as well as late pathologic changes in the labyrinth secondary to meningococcic meningitis.

REPORT OF FOUR CASES OF EARLY CHANGES

CASE 1.—L. R., a boy aged 2 years, was admitted to

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