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Article
November 1936

NASAL VENTILATION IN DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL OF HEADACHE

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1936;24(5):594-599. doi:10.1001/archotol.1936.00640050607005
Abstract

Ephedrine in a physiologic solution of sodium chloride as an agent for local treatment of the nose and the sinuses during acute infection is well known.1 Its value lies in its ability to shrink the respiratory mucosa and thus to restore ventilation of the nose and sinuses and function of the mucosa. Its use has received physiologic justification in that investigators have found it free from all evidence of harmful effect on ciliary function.2 The same may be true of more recently introduced drugs, such as neosynephrin hydrochloride, if equal care is taken to prepare a physiologic solution. Such factors as isotonicity and neutral reaction are being given increasing attention as mucosal function is better understood.

A notable characteristic of ephedrine in physiologic solution of sodium chloride is that its local action is safe and is free from by-effects, such as surface anesthesia and interference with ciliary activity.

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