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Article
December 1936

SYMPATHETIC INNERVATION OF THE NOSE: RESEARCH REPORT

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1936;24(6):687-695. doi:10.1001/archotol.1936.00640050702001
Abstract

The results of anatomic and physiologic investigation indicate that the nasal membranes have a rich innervation from several sources. These nerves may be divided for our present purpose into two main groups—afferent and autonomic. The olfactory nerves are omitted from consideration.

The autonomic fibers come in part from the superior cervical ganglion through the internal carotid plexus. These are the thoracolumbar autonomic, or sympathetic, fibers. Others come from the great superficial petrosal nerve, synapsing in the sphenopalatine ganglion. They include vasodilator and secretomotor fibers. These are the cranial autonomic, or parasympathetic, fibers. The sympathetic fibers from the superior cervical ganglion are chiefly vasoconstrictors, but they also include vasodilators, according to Dastre and Morat.1 The preganglionic fibers arise in the lower cervical and the upper thoracic portion of the cord, reaching the ganglion through the cervical sympathetic trunk.

Vasodilator and secretory fibers from the sphenopalatine ganglion to

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