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Article
January 1937

MASKED SINUSITIS AS A CAUSE OF OBSCURE FEVER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Medical Service of Dr. George Baehr and the Laryngologic Service of Dr. Rudolph Kramer, the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1937;25(1):37-47. doi:10.1001/archotol.1937.00650010045005
Abstract

"Fever of unknown origin"1 and "habitual hyperthermia"2 have repeatedly been the subject of discussion in medical literature. Conditions are relegated to these noncommittal categories when all diagnostic resources have been exhausted and the etiology of the fever remains unexplained. Some patients exhibit a relatively short period of pyrexia, of one or more weeks; others maintain continued or intermittent fever for several years. Occasionally, the etiologic diagnosis becomes apparent only after prolonged observation.1a

We have recently observed a number of patients with fever of obscure etiology who would have fallen into the aforementioned group had not the paranasal accessory sinuses been thoroughly investigated. Involvement of the sinuses often escapes suspicion if the obscure fever is accompanied by splenomegaly, adenopathy or chills. Only after the usual diagnostic measures have been performed with negative results is attention focused on the upper air passages. In eight cases which we are reporting the diagnosis finally

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