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Article
April 1937

INTRATRACHEAL INHALATION ANESTHESIA: A REVIEW OF TEN YEARS' EXPERIENCE, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS FIELD OF USEFULNESS, DETAILS OF TECHNIC AND OBJECTIONS RAISED AGAINST THE METHOD

Arch Otolaryngol. 1937;25(4):405-429. doi:10.1001/archotol.1937.00650010459006
Abstract

In the last twenty-five years intratracheal anesthesia has been hailed as an ideal method, has fallen into disfavor and has returned to be warmly received by those who are familiar with its advantages.

It is interesting to reflect on the reasons for the popularization of this method of anesthesia, the causes of its decline, and, finally, why it has reappeared as a well established permanent technic with an ever widening field of safety and usefulness.

In an article published in 1910, Meltzer stated: "On the basis of my operations and experiments, it seems to me that the giving of ether by the method of intratracheal insufflation is the safest and most effective way of administering this anaesthetic."

In 1911, Meltzer and Auer, of the Rockefeller Institute, published a paper from which they drew the following conclusions: "Dr. C. L. Elsberg was the first to introduce intratracheal anaesthesia in human surgery.

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