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Article
July 1937

IRITIS CAUSED BY ASYMPTOMATIC SPHENOIDITIS WITH ANOMALY OF THE SPHENOID SINUSES

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1937;26(1):83-86. doi:10.1001/archotol.1937.00650020089012

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Abstract

In 1934, while he was in New York, O. H., a man aged 41 at the time of writing, suffered his first attack of iritis. An extensive search for a focus of infection resulted in entirely negative findings. The treatment consisted of local therapy and intramuscular injections of milk, and was followed by gradual improvement and a return to normal but not until the end of three months. Approximately two years later, on April 18, 1936, he presented himself to Dr. Samuel Hirshfeld for examination. The night previous he had suddenly suffered intense pain in the left eye, which immediately became "bloodshot," with sudden marked lacrimation, pronounced photophobia and blurring of vision. He was referred to Dr. Maurice Beigelman, an ophthalmologist, who reported the left pupil to be contracted, with marked pericorneal congestion, cells within the aqueous and reduction in visual acuity to 20/50. The diagnosis was acute iritis.

It

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