[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1937

AMERICAN OTOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1937;26(5):619-647. doi:10.1001/archotol.1937.00650020673009

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Thursday Morning Session, May 27 

SYMPOSIUM ON THE NEURAL MECHANISM OF HEARING 

I. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

Peripheral Apparatus (in the Temporal Bone). Stacy R. Gould, Ph.D., Baltimore.  In view of the limited time available, no attempt is made to review the enormous literature on theories of hearing or to present a systematic description of the anatomy of the inner ear. Instead, emphasis is placed on the fact that it is not yet known how sound waves cause nerve impulses to be set up in the fibers of the cochlear nerve. Attention is directed to certain details of the structure of the organ of Corti that are omitted from most textbooks—in particular, to the relations of the outer hair cells to other structures. No theory of hearing is propounded or defended, but the suggestion is made that writers of theoretical papers on the physiology of hearing have not taken sufficiently

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×