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Article
December 1937

EFFECT OF LESIONS OF THE TYMPANIC MEMBRANE ON THE HEARING ACUITY: OBSERVATIONS ON EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS AND ON MAN

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Otological Research Laboratory, the Johns Hopkins University.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1937;26(6):649-657. doi:10.1001/archotol.1937.00650020721001
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Many investigators during the past seven years have used the phenomenon discovered in 1930 by Wever and Bray1 to study the hearing acuity of animals. There is no longer any doubt that cochlear potentials do change with changes in the intensity of sound that reaches a normal inner ear. However, it has not yet been proved for any lesion that the difference in the electrical potentials before and after an experimental procedure actually does represent a change in hearing. Some observers think the generation of cochlear potentials is a secondary phenomenon and is not related to the actual hearing of the sound. Attempts to compare cochlear potentials with the conditioned reflex responses of animals have failed to establish this point, which is essential to the acceptance and application of experimental observations to problems of clinical otology.To obtain critical evidence on this question, which is of interest both to

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