[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1937

VESTIBULOCEREBRAL PATHWAYS: A CONTRIBUTION TO THE CENTRAL MECHANISM OF VERTIGO

Author Affiliations

NORRISTOWN, PA.; PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Experimental Neurology, D. J. McCarthy Foundation, Temple University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1937;26(6):658-667. doi:10.1001/archotol.1937.00650020730002
Abstract

It has been shown in former experiments that labyrinthine impulses may reach the cerebral cortex. This was found not only when the cortical excitability was increased by strychnine but also with a normal cerebral cortex by recording the cortical potentials before and after rotating the animals (Spiegel1). In the present series of experiments we have studied by what pathways the labyrinthine impulses may ascend toward the cerebral cortex.

It is more or less generally assumed that the cerebellum plays an important part in such conduction. This doctrine may be traced back to Hitzig,2 who in discussing the mechanism of vertigo, held that images of a low order may be formed in the cerebellum together with the adjoining ganglions. Since impulses from a number of sensory nerves enter the cerebellum, Hitzig assumed that the cerebellum transmits these perceptions as a whole to the cerebrum, which is unable to analyze the single

×