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Article
February 1938

LYSOZYME OF NASAL MUCUS: METHOD OF PREPARATION AND PRELIMINARY REPORT ON ITS EFFECT ON GROWTH AND VIRULENCE OF COMMON PATHOGENS OF PARANASAL SINUSES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Oto-Laryngology and Bacteriology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1938;27(2):189-196. doi:10.1001/archotol.1938.00650030198007
Abstract

Lysozyme (lytic enzyme) as first reported and described by Fleming1 in 1922 is a substance found in various body tissues and secretions which has the property of dissolving certain bacteria. Since Fleming's initial work, lysozyme has been studied by many different investigators. Wolff2 has reported on its chemistry, Hoder3 on its relation to immunology, Anderson4 on its importance in vitamin A deficiency, Corper5 on its relation to tuberculosis, Meyer, Thompson, Palmer and Khorazo6 on its purification and properties and Meyer7 and his associates on the mechanism of its action. Fleming8 in 1929 published a comprehensive review of the facts known up to that time.

ACTION OF LYSOZYME ON PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS  In his review Fleming8 stressed the fact that while lysozyme is most active against nonpathogenic bacteria, it can attack pathogenic organisms when allowed to act in the full strength in which it occurs in some parts of the body. He

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