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Article
February 1938

RECURRENT PARALYSIS OF THE LARYNX FOLLOWING INJECTION OF TETANUS ANTITOXIN: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Laryngological Service of Dr. Rudolph Kramer at the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1938;27(2):201-203. doi:10.1001/archotol.1938.00650030210009
Abstract

Paralysis following the injection of antitoxin, although rare in comparison with the frequency of serotherapy, has been reported in nearly a hundred cases since it was first noted, in the early part of the century, by Gangolphe.1 In most of these cases paralysis has followed the injection of tetanus antitoxin, but other serums, such as those used in the treatment of diphtheria, scarlatina, pneumonia and meningococcic meningitis, have been implicated. Doyle,2 in a tabulation of forty-nine cases of neurologic complications of serum disease, found involvement of the brachial plexus more frequent (thirty-three cases) than that of any other portion of the nervous system. Next in frequency was isolated involvement of the radial and the optic nerve; that of the latter was first described by Mason.3 Cases of paralysis of the facial nerve, paralysis of the oculomotor nerve,4 generalized paralysis5 and involvement of the auditory nerve6 have been reported. A search

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