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Article
April 1938

EFFECTS OF DRUGS ON THE STRIA VASCULARIS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the laboratories of the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research, University of California.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1938;27(4):438-443. doi:10.1001/archotol.1938.00650030449006
Abstract

The clinical literature dealing with drugs known to cause impairment of hearing has recently been reviewed by Taylor.1 The length of the list of substances affecting hearing is as appalling as the diversity of their natures. An experimental approach to the problem will prove fruitless unless studies on a few of these agents are made from various angles. Histologic changes in the peripheral auditory mechanism, as well as lesions which might be apparent in the central auditory pathways, when correlated with the results of hearing tests on animals should finally aid in a better understanding of the action of such drugs as quinine. Once it is possible to find and evaluate these changes in terms of the animal's ability to hear, the action of other agents can be more readily determined.

It is not impossible to examine microscopically a section through the cochlea and ascertain the degree to which the

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