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Article
April 1938

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF BACTERIAL MENINGITIS OF AURAL AND OF NASAL ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1938;27(4):444-451. doi:10.1001/archotol.1938.00650030455007
Abstract

Bacterial meningitis occurs frequently and is one of the most important acute infections of the central nervous system. While it usually occurs independently of any primary disease of the ear and the nose, statistical study seems to indicate that, at least in general hospitals, the occurrence of meningitis as a complication of an otorhinologic condition is unpleasantly frequent as compared with its occurrence from other causes. The following tabulation, taken from Williams and

Gasling,1 shows that the meningococcus and the tubercle bacillus are the most common causes of meningitis in the metropolitan area of the city of New York. The frequency of meningococcic meningitis is undoubtedly augmented by epidemics, while tuberculous meningitis is prevalent in the poorer sections of congrested urban districts.

A statistical study of 123 cases of bacterial meningitis occurring in Philadelphia between 1920 and 1937, 96 of which were in the Graduate Hospital of the

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