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Article
October 1938

MORPHOLOGIC AND ROENTGENOLOGIC ASPECTS OF THE TEMPORAL BONE: STUDY OF 536 BONES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO PNEUMATIZATION

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Western Reserve University, and the University Hospitals.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1938;28(4):561-580. doi:10.1001/archotol.1938.00650040572006
Abstract

The more one studies the temporal bone with its vital parts and associations, the more one realizes that this study still offers a great deal which is unknown. Various great anatomists, physiologists, surgeons and clinicians have their names, as a result of their work, attached to various parts of the bone, theories about it and clinical conditions affecting it.1 Herman Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821-1894) in 1863 published his theory of hearing, "Tone Sensations"; Julius Richard Ewald (1856-1921) described the semicircular canals (semicircles of Ewald) and their part in equilibration; Henle's spine bears the name of Jacob Henle (1809-1885), who described it as a reliable guide in locating the antrum in surgical intervention in the mastoid region, and Sir William Macewen (1848-1924) methodically laid out the triangle (Macewen's triangle) as a guide in the mastoid operation. In addition, one can mention the depression of Wilde, the tubes of Eustachius, the hiatus

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