[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1939

ACUTE OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE SUPERIOR MAXILLA IN CHILDREN: REPORT OF A CASE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1939;29(3):417-427. doi:10.1001/archotol.1939.00650050451002
Abstract

Acute osteomyelitis of the superior maxilla is an unusual disease but presents a rather typical appearance in infants. In the recorded cases the same early signs and symptoms have been present. While a gastric disturbance may be the first sign of impending trouble, the first indication of the location of the disease is the edema and swelling of the eyelid, without involvement of the conjunctiva or lacrimal sac. These areas may show a purulent inflammation later in the course of the disease. Swelling of the periorbital tissue may be great enough to cause marked exophthalmos. There are redness, swelling, pain and tenderness over the cheek of the infected side. The inflammation goes on to suppuration, and rupture usually occurs below the inner canthus, at which site a discharging fistula remains. Marked swelling and redness over one half of the hard palate are equally common. Localization also occurs in the alveolar

×