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Article
December 1939

STRUCTURE OF THE PETROUS PORTION OF THE TEMPORAL BONE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE TISSUES IN THE FISSULAR REGION

Arch Otolaryngol. 1939;30(6):922-942. doi:10.1001/archotol.1939.00650061001006
Abstract

To the morphologist the petrous portion of the temporal bone presents several interesting features: It contains a bony case built in a unique manner to shelter the delicate terminals of the auditory and vestibular mechanism; this case is constructed from separate centers of ossification which ultimately blend so completely that there appears, at birth, a composite capsule with no line to indicate the originally separate entities. The capsule thus formed does not enlarge after birth, but increment is made in the petrous portion of the temporal bone in which the capsule is embedded. Even after adult size has been attained, histologic changes in the otic capsule continue throughout life; the site of the most striking postnatal alteration is the small area between the cochlea and the stapes, in the wall of the capsule; in this territory of the fissula ante fenestram the capsule retains nonosseous tissues (connective tissue and hyaline

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