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Article
January 1940

DEFECTS IN SPEECH IN RELATION TO DEFECTS IN HEARING

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(1):7-15. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010008002
Abstract

The influence of defects in hearing and in speech on the social and economic success of civilized man is so obvious that it seems not to require any extended comment. And yet this very fact may give the reason that no thoroughly scientific study of the interrelationship of speech and hearing has been undertaken until recently.

A deaf child is put into a special school, where he is taught to convey his thoughts manually. In earlier days, it was taken for granted that one could not educate him in the broader sense, and so his training was largely vocational, and the one vocation for which every such child seemed foreordained was printing. Every deaf-mute had to become a printer, whether he wanted to or not.

Moreover, the "deaf and dumb" were naturally supposed to be "stupid," and so they were kept in a state of more or less blissful ignorance

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