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Article
January 1940

RELATION OF ALLERGY AND TONSILLECTOMY IN CHILDREN: INCIDENCE OF RESPIRATORY ALLERGY IN CASES OF ROUTINE TONSILLECTOMY

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS; Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, Peiping Union Medical College PEIPING, CHINA
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(1):45-52. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010046006
Abstract

The otolaryngologist, the pediatrician and the general practitioner are frequently confronted with the problem of diagnosis and treatment in cases of recurrent colds, sinusitis, bronchitis and recurrent pneumonia in children. These conditions are generally considered as infectious, and the treatment usually consists of the administration of cold "shots," drainage of sinuses or the removal of the tonsils and adenoids. That these symptoms and signs may be of allergic instead of infectious origin has been emphasized by Piness and Miller, Cohen and Rudolph and Hansel. The allergic nature of these complaints is often not recognized until frank bronchial asthma develops.

Piness and Miller1 pointed out that allergy alone may produce chronic nasal obstruction without sneezing, unassociated with enlarged adenoids, and may cause frequent attacks of rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction in no way related to infection, although often designated as colds or sinusitis. Allergy may also cause persistent sore throat unrelated to

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