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Article
January 1940

ALTERATIONS IN NASAL FUNCTION DUE TO ANATOMIC VARIATIONS OF THE NARES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(1):53-64. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010054007
Abstract

The importance of the inspiratory and expiratory air currents in nasal function has been firmly established for many years. Goodale1 and Lambert Lack2 proved by their experiments that a stream of inspired air does not pursue a straight course from nostril to choana but passes in a wide curve which begins at the nostril, extends through the olfactory fissure and ends in the upper part of the choana. The current of air does not touch the inferior turbinate except for small eddies which curl (1) against the face of the sphenoid, (2) over the inferior turbinates and (3) into the sphenoid sinus.

At a much later date the experiments by Proetz,3 using litmus paper and smoke trails, corroborated these observations. He also added a distinct inspiratory eddy of air in the nasofrontal angle.

Proetz's experiment with smoke brought out an important factor for clinical consideration. It was apparent from watching

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