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Article
March 1940

CHANGES IN THE INTERNAL EAR DUE TO INCREASED ENDOCRANIAL PRESSURE: THE HISTOLOGIC BASIS OF CONGESTIVE INNER EAR

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(3):391-418. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010395001
Abstract

The question whether changes in the inner ear similar to choked disk in the eye occur as a result of increased endocranial pressure has not yet been definitely answered. This is shown by the confusion in nomenclature seen in such terms as choked labyrinth, neuritis of the eighth nerve, stagnation dropsy, neuritis labyrinthica and congestive inner ear.1 Furthermore, many otologists deny absolutely that such changes take place.

Likewise the question of endocranial pressure itself is still in dispute. It is known to arise as a result of the disproportion between the size of the cranial cavity and its contents. A differentiation is made according to whether the pressure increases rapidly, as in acute processes, or gradually, as in chronic conditions. In this paper I shall deal only with chronic brain pressure. If one studies the enormous literature covering endocranial pressure, one finds that one can classify the various theories, according

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