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Article
March 1940

RADICAL MASTOIDECTOMY: ITS EFFECT ON HEARING

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan Medical School.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(3):426-430. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010430003
Abstract

The aural surgeon contemplating the performance of a radical mastoidectomy must ask of himself and discuss with his patient the following questions: What dangers are involved in neglecting the chronic suppuration of the ear? What chances are taken of injuring the facial nerve during the operation? What assurance can be given the patient regarding freedom from aural discharge following operation? What change will there be in the hearing? Much information is available in reference to the first three questions. The otologist can determine with considerable accuracy the imminence of dangerous complications from his knowledge of the progression of pathologic changes involved in the chronic suppurative process. He can assure his patient that, barring rare accidents and unforeseen complications, the facial muscles will retain their normal functions after operation. The pathologic changes manifest in the tympanum, the throat, the nose, the paranasal sinuses and the nasopharynx allow him to venture a

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