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Article
March 1940

VALUE OF ENCEPHALOGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF OTOGENIC INTRACRANIAL COMPLICATIONS

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(3):431-436. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010435004
Abstract

Since Symmonds1 established the syndrome of otitic hydrocephalus, in 1931, a great number of cases have been recorded in the literature which seem to support his conception of an increase of intracranial pressure stimulated by the focus of otitis media in children or adolescents.

The primary symptoms recorded are the increase of intracranial pressure combined with vomiting, papilledema and headaches, while the spinal fluid is always found clear. The majority of patients recover under adequate treatment.

The symptoms which, according to Symmonds, are significant for otitic hydrocephalus are present not only in this entity but also in (1) edema of the brain, (2) swelling of the brain (3) serous meningitis and (4) nonsuppurative encephalitis.2 All these conditions are occasionally caused by otitis media. A few words are in order to differentiate between edema and swelling of the brain. In swelling of the brain the amount of solid constituents of the

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