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Article
April 1940

CHONDROMA OF THE ETHMOIDWITH REPORT OF A CASE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(4):645-652. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010650006
Abstract

Chondroma of the ethmoid attracts the attention of clinician and pathologist alike—the former because of its bizarre course and symptoms; the latter because of its comparative rarity. Chondroma is rare in any region of the body but is found least frequently in the nose and accessory sinuses. The minimal incidence of such neoplasms is attested by Geschickter1 in a classification of 211 tumors of the nasal and paranasal cavities, selected from over 2,000 specimens removed surgically at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. In this series there were 19 benign epithelial tumors, 139 malignant epithelial tumors, 37 benign tumors of connective tissue (exclusive of 76 osteomas) and 16 sarcomas. The benign tumors of connective tissue consisted of angioma, plasmocytoma and fibroma; no case of chondroma was found.

Enchondroma, a cartilaginous tumor within a cavity, was first described by Müller,2 in 1836. Virchow3 in 1857 created the term myxoma and divided soft enchondromas

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