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Article
July 1940

INTRADURAL CONDITIONS IN RELATION TO RHINOLOGY AND OTOLOGY: CRITICAL SURVEY OF RECENT LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;32(1):54-120. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660020055005
Abstract

POLIOMYELITIS  Schultz and Gebhardt,1 in 1931, demonstrated that the virus of poliomyelitis passes from the mucous membranes by way of the olfactory nerve, olfactory bulb and olfactory tracts.

ENTRANCE AND PATHWAYS OF THE VIRUS  In 1938, Schultz2 reviewed the whole subject of anatomy of the olfactory apparatus. In man the olfactory portion of the nasal mucous membrane occupies the upper third of the nasal septum, nearly the whole of the superior concha and a small portion of the middle concha (Schaeffer3). This area is differentiated from the adjacent mucosa by its yellowish or brownish tint and its slightly greater thickness.Histologically, three kinds of cells may be recognized in the olfactory area: (1) true olfactory nerve cells, (2) supporting, or sustentacular, cells and (3) small stellate basal cells. The cells rest directly on the tunica propria, without an intervening basement membrane, this being the only area in the body where

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