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Article
October 1940

THE SACCULE: OBSERVATIONS ON A DIFFERENTIATED REENFORCED AREA OF THE SACCULAR WALL IN MAN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;32(4):678-691. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660020683005
Abstract

Ever since Scarpa1 described the membranous vesicles in the vestibule of the labyrinth their walls have generally been considered as undifferentiated except for the areas of the maculas. Thus it is customary for modern anatomists, in describing the membranous labyrinth, to include the walls of the utricle, the saccule and the membranous semicircular canals in a short general statement. Such a description has been given by the following authors: Kolmer,2 A. Eckert Möbius,3 Shambaugh4 and Maximow and Bloom.5 A general agreement exists that these membranous walls are made up of two thin layers of cells separated by a basement membrane, an outer connective tissue or mesothelial layer and an inner layer of exceedingly thin (3 to 4 microns) polygonal squamous cells. Occasional branched melanophores are found in the outer layer of connective tissue, especially in lower mammalian forms.

While examining a large number of sections of human temporal bones I

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