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Article
November 1940

USE OF ANTICOAGULANTS IN CASES OF POSTOPERATIVE THROMBOSIS AND EMBOLISM

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;32(5):934-940. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660020941010
Abstract

For a general surgeon to present the problem of thrombosis and embolism to an otolaryngologic society it will be necessary to draw comparisons between etiologic factors in the extremities and in the skull.

After discussing the subject with a number of otolaryngologists, I feel that there are certain operations in which the general principles of etiology and treatment involved are similar. Before discussing the therapeutic problem it seems advisable to review and classify the clinical types encountered. There are, roughly, four main types of thrombophlebitis. While the mean of each type is a distinct entity at the extremes, there are gradations from one type to another. Their classification is as follows:

  1. Thrombosis. This is the type most commonly encountered in general surgical practice. A silent thrombus forms in the extremity, and suddenly, without warning, an embolus is broken off and transported to the lungs, sometimes causing immediate death. In

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