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Article
December 1940

RECENT EXPERIENCES WITH OPERATION ON THE FACIAL NERVE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otorhinolaryngology, University of California Medical School and the Children's Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;32(6):1071-1075. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660021079008
Abstract

In 1929 a facial nerve which had been severed during a mastoidectomy was repaired by end to end anastomosis, with a good result. This procedure was reported in 1931.1 In January 1940, the patient had good tone in the facial muscles and emotional control had improved so that the facial movements were only slightly weakened on the affected side. The frontalis muscle, however, was still inactive.

Since this first operation, 15 more patients with facial paralysis have been operated on, with 1 failure. From the cases of these 15 patients, 4 cases are chosen for presentation here, as illustrative of various points.

REPORT OF CASES  The first case is of particular interest because two grafts, laid side by side, were used.Case 1.—R. W., a boy 18 months old, had had two simple mastoidectomies. During the performance of the second, on July 10, 1939, the nerve was injured, and the

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