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Article
April 1941

MECHANISM AND TREATMENT OF NEUROTIC SYMPTOMS ESPECIALLY OF THE EAR, NOSE AND THROAT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;33(4):579-591. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660030587007
Abstract

Generally speaking, one may say that psychoneurotic symptoms result from emotional disturbances. These emotional disturbances may be relatively acute in an otherwise stable person, or, as is so often the case, they stem from a chronic, lifelong instability of personality. They are translated into symptoms by means of: (1) tension primarily in the autonomic nervous system and (2) symbolism. When a person is afraid, or hates or is irritable, his heart rate tends to increase, his blood pressure to rise, his intestines to contract. These manifestations result from disturbed activity of the autonomic nervous system (usually both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic systems are involved), and since every portion of the organism is under the influence of these symptoms, the unstable and emotional person tends to have symptoms in most of the body. Many neurotic patients will come to the physician with one presenting complaint, yet on more thorough investigation

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