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Article
April 1941

GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NEURALGIA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;33(4):663-665. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660030671014
Abstract

The infrequency of instances of glossopharyngeal neuralgia prompts the reporting of this case. Previous excellent reviews of the subject obviate a lengthy discussion in this paper.1 The syndrome is similar to that of trigeminal neuralgia, except for the distribution of pain. There are sudden paroxysms of pain, originating in the side of the throat or deep in the ear or in the base of the tongue. The pain radiates almost always to some part of the ear. Swallowing and the raising of the pressure in the intrapharyngeal region or the intraeustachian tube (as in sneezing) are common precipitating acts. The paroxysms tend to recur, and at shorter intervals. There may or may not be a demonstrable trigger zone. There is no known cause or pathologic condition associated with this syndrome, though of course ninth nerve pain may result from a traumatic or a neoplastic lesion.

REPORT OF A CASE  The

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