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Article
May 1941

PATENCY OF THE EUSTACHIAN TUBE IN RELATION TO PROFOUND HEARING LOSS IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

SHANGHAI, CHINA; ABINGTON, PA.
From the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf and the Otological Research Laboratory of the Abington Memorial Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;33(5):824-829. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660030834013
Abstract

Recent reports1 recording the results of irradiation of the eustachian orifice and tube have focused attention on disease of this structure in children in relation to the improvement of their hearing and the presumed effect of such disease in childhood on the development of deafness in adult life. In the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, at Mt. Airy, there are in residence 540 children. The assigned causes of deafness in these children are: biologic defect, 53 per cent; meningitis, 17 per cent; trauma, 14 per cent; contagious diseases (such as measles, scarlet fever and their sequelae), 15 per cent and incidental causes, 1 per cent.

In a previous report2 true congenital deafness was shown to be a relatively unusual condition, since an insignificant number of the children in this group had parents who were born deaf. In consequence the term "biologic defect" was substituted to fulfil the requirements of statistical

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