[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1941

NASOPHARYNGEAL FIBROMA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(1):57-68. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040067007
Abstract

Many physicians with varied clinical experience have never encountered a fibroma of the nasopharynx. It is, therefore, a relatively rare tumor, yet a number of case reports are found in the literature.

Goldsmith1 described the growth succinctly as a tumor formation histologically nonmalignant but pursuing clinically a malignant course, occurring almost entirely in young males and definitely retrogressing when the patient reaches the approximate age of 23, unique among tissue growths and found alone in the nasopharynx. Females are not, however, immune.

Ewing2 said that the tumor usually appears as a firm, pale red mass attached by a broad base in the nasopharynx and not freely movable. The main mass of the tumor consists of dense fibrous and elastic tissue, containing numerous large, thin-walled blood vessels, located more abundantly near the free portion of the tumor. The cells are round, spindle-shaped or star-shaped fibroblasts, which are rather scanty except in

×