[Skip to Navigation]
Article
August 1941

SPHENOID SINUS: ANATOMIC STUDY, WITH CONSIDERATION OF THE CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SPHENOID SINUS

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(2):225-253. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040251002
Abstract

The sphenoid sinus reflects its anatomic relations in its walls. Adjacent structures, present before the development of the sinus, produce irregularities in the walls of the sinus as the cavity grows to contact and pass beyond them. Often the extension is such as to form recesses on either side of an elevation, and in the well pneumatized cavities the walls commonly present a continuous sequence of depressions and elevations. In such cases only a thin bony plate separates the sinus from the adjacent structures, and the intimate relationship thus established contributes much to the clinical importance of the sphenoid sinus.

The structures usually involved in this relationship are the blood vessels and nerves which course alongside the sinus on their way to or from the cranial cavity.

Also closely related to a sphenoid sinus are its fellow sinus, contiguous posterior ethmoid cells and the sella turcica, which protrudes downward into

×