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Article
August 1941

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF PHILADELPHIA, SECTION OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY, AND NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE, SECTION OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(2):421-427. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040447018

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Abstract

Some Interrelationships of Modern Hematology and Otolaryngology. Dr. Thomas Fitz-Hugh Jr.  A brief review is presented of the more important hematologic disorders affecting the nose, oropharynx, larynx and auditory apparatus. Lingual mucosal strophulous glossitis and dysphagia in connection with anemia respond favorably to treatment directed toward the special type of anemia and the underlying cause. In the Plummer-Vinson syndrome curious veils of mucous membrane partly obstruct the lower part of the pharynx. Here, too, treatment directed to the disease is more effective than esophageal instrumentation. Aplastic anemia is frequently associated with oropharyngeal ulceration, necrosis and bleeding, and any severe anemia may produce vertigo, tinnitus and even deafness.In leukemia, lymphosarcoma and Hodgkin's disease, not only the oral mucosa but also the tonsils and cervical nodes may present ulcerative and necrotic lesions. Epistaxis and gingival bleeding may occur, and in cases of mediastinal involvement recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been observed.

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