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Article
September 1941

ACOUSTIC TRAUMA IN MAN: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Otolaryngology, the University of Chicago.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(3):429-452. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040469001
Abstract

Audiometric studies made during the past decade by Bunch,1 Larsen,2 Dickson and his associates,3 McCord and his associates4 and others have helped to crystallize in otologic practice the clinical entity of acoustic trauma. Extensive bibliographies on the subject appear in the papers of Bunch, Larsen, and McCord and his associates. Many types of sound stimuli are now known to be injurious to the ear, e. g., the noise of pneumatically driven tools, such as those used in riveting, chipping steel and breaking concrete; the noise of motors—gasoline (airplane), oil (Diesel) and electric; the noise of steam engines and whistles (locomotives); the noise of discharging firearms (large and small); single explosive sounds, such as that from a firecracker and that from a gas explosion, and the noise of machines, such as those used for grinding metal and for stamping out metal parts and drop hammers. A shock from a blow on

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