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Article
September 1941

CHRONIC MASTOIDITIS, MENINGITIS AND LABYRINTHITIS; OPERATION; RECOVERY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(3):588-590. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040628013
Abstract

Since sulfanilamide has been made available to the members of the medical profession, many cases have been reported in which otitic meningitis has been cured. It is such a case that I wish to review here.

A white man aged 57, of Polish nativity, a waiter, was admitted to the ear, nose and throat service of Bellevue Hospital, New York, on May 21, 1940. The chief complaint was pain of five days' duration in the left temporal region. Six months prior to admission there was a spontaneous rupture of the drum membrane of the left ear, and the discharge had been continuous since that time, with a considerable increase in amount shortly before the patient entered the hospital. One week prior to admission, hearing in the left ear became much impaired. There was no vertigo, nausea, vomiting or spontaneous nystagmus. The right drum membrane was retracted; the left had a

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