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Article
October 1941

INTRACRANIAL EDEMA FOLLOWING OCCLUSION OF ONE LATERAL SINUS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From Department of Surgery, Jewish Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(4):825-828. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040881015
Abstract

Such terms as "serous meningitis,"1a "otitic hydrocephalus,"1b "toxic hydrocephalus," "pseudo-abscess" and "cerebral edema of unknown cause"1c are among those that have been used to describe a state of intracranial hypertension which occurs in the presence of infection about the middle ear and mastoid process of the temporal bone with no evidence of intracranial infection. The number and variability of these titles indicate that the nature of this state is not well understood. In general the cases which have been reported under these titles can be divided into two groups: those in which there is an increase in the cell count of the cerebrospinal fluid; those in which the fluid shows no rise in the cell count.

The condition in the first group may be explained by an aseptic intracranial inflammatory process secondary to an extradural infection or by mildly active intracranial infections in patients who have sufficient local resistance to

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