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Article
November 1941

TRAUMATIC CANCER OF THE TONGUE

Author Affiliations

MARSHFIELD, WIS.
From the Marshfield Clinic.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(5):1023-1024. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660041097013
Abstract

"The incidence of well-attested traumatic tumors is extremely low" (Ewing1). Therefore, it seems justified to report a case of squamous cell epithelioma of the tongue in which the traumatic origin appears to be established as definitely as possible under nonexperimental conditions.

REPORT OF A CASE  A white woman 43 years of age, married, on Feb. 28, 1938 had two teeth pulled, one from the right side of the upper jaw and a molar from the left side of the lower jaw. While the latter was being removed the top of it broke off, and the dentist pinched into the adjacent side of the tongue with his forceps. According to the patient, it was "quite a hard bump because the dentist excused himself and said he broke off the top of the tooth." While the patient was on the way home her tongue began to hurt and burn. After she arrived

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