[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.186.91. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
December 1941

REVIEW OF ALLERGY FOR 1940

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.; OMAHA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(6):1178-1186. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660041272015
Abstract

An important development in the field of allergy is the recognition of a large group of cases closely resembling cases of allergy, but with certain fundamental differences. Rackemann,1 in his article on intrinsic asthma and in his review of the literature on allergy for 1939, began with this significant statement: "All is not allergy that wheezes." By the same token, sneezing and itching of various kinds which seem like allergy may not be due to allergy in the ordinary clinical sense. Many of the patients with these disturbances first come under the care of the rhinologist because of colds; others, because of vasomotor rhinitis. Mortality in the group with the intrinsic conditions is much higher than in the group with extrinsic, or true, allergy. Alexander,2 in his presidential address of 1939, called attention to the same group. He stated that it is comprised of patients with bronchial asthma, vasomotor rhinitis

×