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Article
June 1942

STUDIES ON PUPILS OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAFIV. MECHANISM OF INHERITANCE OF DEAFNESS

Author Affiliations

ABINGTON, PA.; BETHESDA, MD.
From the Otological Research Laboratory, Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington, Pa., and the Division of Public Health Methods, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md., and the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, Mount Airy, Pa.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1942;35(6):871-882. doi:10.1001/archotol.1942.00670010879004
Abstract

It is well known that the majority of young children who are profoundly deaf are stated to have been born deaf, and it has long been accepted that this presumed congenital deafness is often hereditary. Before the development of the modern views on modes of inheritance teachers and other persons in contact with the so-called deaf mutes noted that in certain families the defect appeared generation after generation and that in others it frequently occurred among the offspring of consanguineous marriages (Bell1; Fay2). In recent years otologists familiar with genetic analysis have, from the study of a limited number of pedigrees, arrived at the conclusion that this form of profound deafness is transmitted according to a simple mendelian scheme (Albrecht3; Ciocco and associates4).

The implications of such a conclusion and its importance viewed either from a broad public health standpoint or from the position of the otologist whose advice is

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