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Article
June 1942

RADICAL MASTOIDECTOMY WITH COMPLETE RECOVERY IN A CASE OF CHRONIC LYMPHATIC LEUKEMIA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the service of Dr. John D. Kernan, Lenox Hill Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1942;35(6):922-924. doi:10.1001/archotol.1942.00670010930010

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Abstract

In most cases of leukemia a serious infection is usually a terminating episode. This is especially true in lymphatic and monocytic leukemia, in which there is a diminished number of phagocytic polymorphonuclears, both in the blood and in the marrow. The case under consideration is interesting for several reasons. First, the patient was known to have leukemia for at least five years prior to operation; second, his blood picture showed no ultimate change due to the infection, and, third, after a radical mastoidectomy he has remained comparatively well for four years. An abstract of his case history follows:

REPORT OF A CASE  D. S., a white man 45 years of age, was admitted to Lenox Hill Hospital on Dec. 3, 1937, complaining of pain, stiffness and swelling posteriorly on the right side of his neck. The pain radiated anteriorly and up to the right temporal area and was becoming more

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