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Article
December 1942

RELATION OF THE EUSTACHIAN TUBE TO CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE DEAFNESS

Author Affiliations

PASADENA, CALIF.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1942;36(6):926-936. doi:10.1001/archotol.1942.03760060166009
Abstract

It is an established fact that blockage of the eustachian tube plays an important role in the development of chronic progressive deafness. Coates1 stated that most of the chronic progressive deafness which becomes evident in adult life has an origin in a neglected eustachian tube or inflammation of the middle ear in childhood. Crowe and Baylor2 stated that a long-continued partial obstruction of the eustachian tube in children causes retraction of the tympanic membrane, impaired hearing for high tones, with relatively good hearing for low tones, and sometimes total loss of hearing by bone conduction.

The eustachian tube was treated for this type of deafness as far back as 1654 by Tulpus, who first described blockage of the eustachian tube in relation to certain types of deafness. Valsalva in 1707 described self inflation of the eustachian tube to act as a means of clearing mucus from the ear

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