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Article
March 1943

ABSCESS OF THE TEMPOROSPHENOID LOBE: A REVIEW, WITH REPORT OF A CASE COMPLICATED BY PETROSITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Otolaryngological Service of Dr. Goodlatte B. Gilmore, Morrisania City Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;37(3):411-420. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670030421008
Abstract

Although Hippocrates knew the dangers to the brain in aural disease, the association of aural suppuration with abscess of the brain was regarded for many centuries as purely accidental. Morgagni, in the eighteenth century, was one of the first to voice the opinion that aural suppuration was primary and abscess of the brain secondary. Previous to this, even Valsalva had regarded the abscess as primary. Morand,1 in the "Opuscules de Chirurgie" published in Paris in 1768, as quoted by Scott, published the first case report of otitic abscess of the brain, with recovery after operation. In 1873 Luther Holden,2 in the St. Bartholomew's Hospital Reports, recorded an operative recovery from otitic abscess of the brain. After this, Gowers and Barker,3 Schondorff4 Truckenbrod,5 Schwartze6 and Horsley7 reported successful operations on the brain for abscess. In a classic monograph published in 1893, Macewen8 reported 15 cases of abscess of the brain with

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