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Article
May 1943

RELATION OF HEMATOLOGY AND OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Otolaryngological Department, Morrisania City Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;37(5):691-698. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670030705008
Abstract

Examination of the blood of persons with some otolaryngologic diseases yields important information relative to diagnosis or prognosis. There are pathologic conditions in the blood which reveal themselves by lesions in the mucous membrane of the nose and throat. Conversely, diseased conditions in the nose and throat produce changes in the blood with which the otolaryngologist should be familiar.

The blood is a highly complex fluid which holds corpuscles in suspension. When blood is centrifuged the cells are separated from the fluid portion, called the plasma. The latter contains proteins, various organic and inorganic materials, hormones, antibodies, enzymes and chemical compounds whose elements are still undetermined.

The cells of the whole blood are the red cells, or erythrocytes, the white cells, or leukocytes, and the platelets, or thrombocytes.

According to Best and Taylor,1 the chief function of the erythrocytes is to store and carry hemoglobin. Hemoglobin in turn is the

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